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Test your knowledge about spring driving

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  • Test your knowledge to see if you are prepared for
    this spring's driving challenges.

  • Seat belts save lives and should be worn at all times.

    Select
    True
    Select
    False

    Seat belts save lives

  • Most vehicles have blind spots, which are areas of the roadway a driver cannot see. Blind spot hazards can be minimized by:

    Select
    Shifting your head/body to see around vehicle structural components that block your view.
    Select
    Shifting your head to view your side mirrors at a different angle.
    Select
    Tracking vehicles as they enter and exit your blind spots, so you know where they are
    Select
    All of the above

    All of the above are correct.

  • Because it is spring and all the hazards of driving are gone, I can go back to driving irresponsibly such as sightseeing, reading and texting, while on the road.

    Select
    True
    Select
    False

    All these activities are dangerous and should not be done during any season

  • To save fuel, it is ok to roll through stop signs as long as no one is around as it takes more fuel to stop and then start again.

    Select
    True
    Select
    False

    Rolling through stop signs is illegal and a bad habit to develop.
    Always come to a complete stop at a stop sign.

  • The recommended following distance under ideal driving conditions is two seconds for cars. Commercial trucks and buses require four to eight seconds depending on their size. You can calculate the following distance in seconds by:

    Select
    Looking at the car in front of you and estimating.
    Select
    Waiting for the car in front of you to pass a fixed object and counting one thousand and one, one thousand and two, etc., until you pass the same object.
    Select
    Calling the "Smokey in the air" to see what they are clocking you at.
    Select
    All of the above

    Waiting for the car in front of you to pass a fixed object and counting one thousand and one, one thousand and two, etc., until you pass the same will give you the best estimate of time.

  • If someone is tailgating you in heavy traffic, you should:

    Select
    Slam on your brakes as a warning to the tailgater.
    Select
    Drive faster to get away from the tailgater.
    Select
    Slow down gradually to allow for more space between you and the vehicle in front of you.
    Select
    There is nothing you can do about tailgaters.

    By slowing down gradually and maintaining more space between you and the vehicle in front of you, you are less likely to have to stop quickly, thereby allowing the tailgater more time to react. They will likely not like your slower speed and move around you as well, eliminating the tailgating hazard.

  • The warm sun of spring melts ice and snow during the day.
    What hazards does this present to drivers?

    Select
    A. None, winter is gone
    Select
    B. Water refreezes on the road overnight causing slippery conditions.
    Select
    E. Both B & C
    Select
    C. The melting and freezing pattern creates potholes and rough roads
    Select
    D. The days are longer

    Icy roads, potholes and rough roads are still a problem in the spring.

  • Many states have passed Move-Over laws to protect law enforcement and emergency personnel who have stopped along the side of the road. Generally these laws require you to:

    Select
    Speed up to pass them as quickly as possible.
    Select
    Slow down to 10 mph.
    Select
    Change lanes to provide safe clearance. If you cannot change lanes, slow to 20 mph below the posted speed limit.
    Select
    All of the above

    Change lanes to provide safe clearance. If you cannot change lanes, slow to 20 mph below the posted speed limit.

  • When changing lanes or pulling out from a side road or parking lot,
    if another driver needs to alter his or her driving to compensate for your actions, you have likely made an unsafe driving maneuver.

    Select
    True
    Select
    False

    In these cases the other vehicle had the right-of-way. If they had not been paying attention, you could have caused an accident.

  • Which of the following driving behavior can lead to aggressive driving or "road rage" in the traffic around us?

    Select
    Pulling out in front of another vehicle.
    Select
    Weaving on the road while talking on your cellular phone.
    Select
    Flashing your headlights at other drivers.
    Select
    Tailgating.
    Select
    Not signaling when changing lanes or turning.
    Select
    All of the above.

    All of these behaviors can trigger aggressive driving in other motorists.

  • To drive safely during spring rains, you should:

    Select
    Drive with your lights on so you can see and be seen better.
    Select
    Ensure your wiper blades are in good repair.
    Select
    Increase your following distance behind the vehicle in front of you.
    Select
    All of the above.

    All of the above activities should be practiced to drive safely during spring rains

  • You are approaching a construction zone where you are required to merge into one lane and you notice that there is a large, slow moving vehicle ahead of you. You suspect that if you are stuck behind this vehicle it will significantly slow your trip. As you approach the merging area you should:

    Select
    A. Speed up and cut in front of the slower vehicle
    Select
    B. Pull in behind this slower vehicle and be patient
    Select
    C. Look out for other motorists who may drive recklessly attempting to beat the slower vehicle into the construction zone.
    Select
    D. Both B and C are correct

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, there are more than 800 fatal motor vehicle accidents in and around construction zones each year. Avoid taking risks both when entering and when driving within construction zones and be aware of the hazardous driving behaviors of others.

  • Your score:  out of 

    Your score:

    • 0-2 study more
    • 3-4 keep trying
    • 5-6 getting there
    • 7+ very knowledgeable
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This quiz is a tool only and does not cover all possible conditions or constitute legal advice. Travelers and its affiliates disclaim all forms of warranties, without limitation and shall not be liable to any party for any damages arising out of or in connection with the information provided or its use. No coverage is implied. Please drive safely.

Protecting your business



Two fundamental aspects of managing business risks are preparing for the multitude of emergencies that might lead to business interruptions or pose hazardous conditions and knowing how to assess them accurately to pinpoint your vulnerabilities. Below are several topics to get you started and then log into the Risk Control Customer Portal to take advantage of resources to assist your business in implementing these layers of protection.

Flood protection

Work zone awareness

Tornadoes

Wildfires

Transportation safety

Hurricanes

Heat illness

Pool and spa safety

"811" one-call system

Winter storms

Winter power failures

Cold weather

Are you prepared?

An effective emergency preparedness plan can save lives, reduce property damage and minimize interruption of business operations.

Take the Spring Driving Safety Quiz

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